Sunday, December 8, 2013

Results of 2013 Rainbow Awards

The results of the 2013 Rainbow Awards have just been posted and I now have some great recommendations to go pick up and read. Big congratulations to the authors! Of all the prize winning books, I read the following over the last year and I can confirm first-hand that they are good reads:

  • AJ Rose - Power Exchange (#4 Best Gay Mystery / Thriller, #8 Best Gay Debut)
  • Amy Lane - Under the Rushes (#1 tie Best Gay Sci-Fi / Futuristic)
  • J.L. Merrow - Pressure Head (#3 Best Gay Mystery / Thriller)
  • J.L. Merrow – Slam (#1 Best LGBT Romantic Comedy)
  • J. Tullos Hennig – GreenWode (#1 Best B/T & LGBT Fantasy, Paranormal Romance; Sci-fi / Futuristic; #1 Best B/T &; LGBT Debut; #1 Best LGBT Novel)
  • Lou Harper - Spirit Sanguine (#1 Best Gay Paranormal Romance, # 10 tie Best Gay Novel)

I'm especially pleased that J. Tullos Hennig's book GREENWODE placed #1 in so many categories -- this book and the sequel SHIREWODE are not to be missed! You can see the full results of the 2013 Rainbow Awards at Elisa Rolle's blog. Copyright © Obsidian Bookshelf. I don't allow my content to be copied and reposted in full. You may use an excerpt (a few sentences) with a return link, but not the entire post.
Links:

Monday, June 10, 2013

Reach for the Moon available for purchase

Reach For the Moon is now available for purchase in your format of choice at All Romance Ebooks and at Amazon.com, and it will be at an 80% discount through Friday June 14. This means that instead of its regular price of $4.99, you can get it for $1.00.

You can find it at All Romance Ebooks and Amazon.com.

And here we go again with the book blurb: Christmas vacation 1984 is far from festive at the house of eighteen year-old Alejo Sandoval. His parents teeter on the verge of divorce. His final semester of high school looms ahead. He has just found out that his trickster cousin Martin has vanished, leaving no traces behind. And he keeps a secret that could destroy his place within his religious Hispanic world—he and his best friend Bobby Gallegos are lovers.

Independent and exasperating, Bobby is the love of his life. There is no one Alejo would rather have at his side when his mother and aunt send him on a road trip to unravel his cousin’s mysterious disappearance. But what starts as an excuse to get out of Albuquerque and enjoy a romantic road trip soon takes on serious overtones. Martin might have endangered his life by coming out as gay.

Their short fact-finding mission turns into a quest for Martin’s whereabouts through the secretive small towns of New Mexico. Stress and speculation have set Alejo’s eccentric relatives against each other, and Alejo and Bobby are about to walk into the crossfire.

Note: REACH FOR THE MOON is listed as a prequel to FALL INTO THE SUN, but only in the sense of having the same characters at a younger age. Think of FALL INTO THE SUN as what might have occurred on an alternate timeline. Meanwhile, REACH FOR THE MOON is what really happened on the main timeline. The events of REACH FOR THE MOON do not fit into the backstory of FALL INTO THE SUN. Approximate length is 90K words.


Copyright © Obsidian Bookshelf. I don't allow my content to be copied and reposted in full. You may use an excerpt (a few sentences) with a return link, but not the entire post.
Links:

Friday, May 24, 2013

Reach For the Moon

Reach For the Moon
Contemporary gay romance
Cover Art by Jordan Castillo Price
Wordcount: 90,000 words
Published: June 2013
(RELEASE DATE - June 10)
Price: $ 4.99

Book Blurb: Christmas vacation 1984 is far from festive at the house of eighteen year-old Alejo Sandoval. His parents teeter on the verge of divorce. His final semester of high school looms ahead. He has just found out that his trickster cousin Martin has vanished, leaving no traces behind. And he keeps a secret that could destroy his place within his religious Hispanic world—he and his best friend Bobby Gallegos are lovers.

Independent and exasperating, Bobby is the love of his life. There is no one Alejo would rather have at his side when his mother and aunt send him on a road trip to unravel his cousin’s mysterious disappearance. But what starts as an excuse to get out of Albuquerque and enjoy a romantic road trip soon takes on serious overtones. Martin might have endangered his life by coming out as gay.

Their short fact-finding mission turns into a quest for Martin’s whereabouts through the secretive small towns of New Mexico. Stress and speculation have set Alejo’s eccentric relatives against each other, and Alejo and Bobby are about to walk into the crossfire.

Note: REACH FOR THE MOON is listed as a prequel to FALL INTO THE SUN, but only in the sense of having the same characters at a younger age. Think of FALL INTO THE SUN as what might have occurred on an alternate timeline. Meanwhile, REACH FOR THE MOON is what really happened on the main timeline. The events of REACH FOR THE MOON do not fit into the backstory of FALL INTO THE SUN.

Buy links coming soon.
Buy at Amazon.com
Buy at All Romance Ebooks in your ebook format of choice.

Add it to your shelf on Goodreads.com.
Read an EXCERPT of the first 10 pages at Goodreads.com

Reviews coming soon.

Official release date for Reach For the Moon

Finally, an official release date: Monday June 10, 2013. Here is the blurb:

Christmas vacation 1984 is far from festive at the house of eighteen year-old Alejo Sandoval. His parents teeter on the verge of divorce. His final semester of high school looms ahead. He has just found out that his trickster cousin Martin has vanished, leaving no traces behind. And he keeps a secret that could destroy his place within his religious Hispanic world—he and his best friend Bobby Gallegos are lovers.

Independent and exasperating, Bobby is the love of his life. There is no one Alejo would rather have at his side when his mother and aunt send him on a road trip to unravel his cousin’s mysterious disappearance. But what starts as an excuse to get out of Albuquerque and enjoy a romantic road trip soon takes on serious overtones. Martin might have endangered his life by coming out as gay.

Their short fact-finding mission turns into a quest for Martin’s whereabouts through the secretive small towns of New Mexico. Stress and speculation have set Alejo’s eccentric relatives against each other, and Alejo and Bobby are about to walk into the crossfire.

Note: REACH FOR THE MOON is listed as a prequel to FALL INTO THE SUN, but only in the sense of having the same characters at a younger age. Think of FALL INTO THE SUN as what might have occurred on an alternate timeline. Meanwhile, REACH FOR THE MOON is what really happened on the main timeline. The events of REACH FOR THE MOON do not fit into the backstory of FALL INTO THE SUN.

I have a list of readers who have won copies of this book from giveaways last year, and I will send you the copies a few days before June 10. Thank you very much for your patience! If anyone would like an advance review copy, please email me at veekay2000 [at] gmail [dot] com. Meanwhile, you can add the book to your Goodreads shelf here.

Copyright © Obsidian Bookshelf. I don't allow my content to be copied and reposted in full. You may use an excerpt (a few sentences) with a return link, but not the entire post.
Links:

Sunday, March 17, 2013

Pet weirdness – bringing in mice

The other night we let in Little Gray because it was way too cold to keep him outside even in his little heated doghouse.

To our shock and dismay, he trotted inside with a mouse in his mouth before we could notice and block his way. I don’t know what he was thinking. That he had to pay a cover charge to get in?

Or maybe he just wanted to give us a gift? Or, more likely, he had just caught the mouse when he saw the back door open and didn’t want to give up either opportunity.

Anyway, he dropped the mouse, which scurried off into my husband’s study, which is heaped with papers and clutter to hide in. For the rest of the evening, the cat sat in the back hallway and attempted to keep an eye on the entire house.

Finally, the mouse showed up around midnight, scampering along the living room. The cat was on him like white on rice (to work in a cliché), but ran into the kitchen with his prize as soon as I came out of the bedroom to see what was going on.

For some reason, Little Gray dropped the mouse in the kitchen, and my husband and I were able to shoo it out the front door while keeping the cat indoors. The mouse looked unharmed but obviously shaken up. I guess it now had a story to tell its dozens of grandchildren.

Do you ever have your cat try to bring prey into the house? If so, what does he bring?

Copyright © Obsidian Bookshelf. I don't allow my content to be copied and reposted in full. You may use an excerpt (a few sentences) with a return link, but not the entire post.
Links:

Monday, March 11, 2013

Pet weirdness – eating bugs

Okay, I know that Little Gray has some issues, having once been a stray cat. Even after five years in a good home, he remains fascinated by water as if remembering that a refreshing drink isn’t easy to find.

Whenever I water the plants on the back porch, he stares at the streams that trickle out of the bottom of the pots and run off the edge of the porch. He will even follow them and dab his paw into the wetness. He doesn’t trust the quality of the water he gets when I refill his bowl. He has to sniff it first and often will dip his paw in the water, sniff his paw, and then lick the water off to make sure of the taste.

Also, he has an urgent need to sniff everything that I have in my hand whether it’s a book or a turtle that I’m carrying from one part of the yard to the other. He’s not hungry per se, but he wants to know what I have.

The pet weirdness reached a new height the other evening when he was sitting on my lap in the kitchen and we both noticed a small cricket hopping along the tiled floor. (This was probably a leftover cricket from our pet toad, who recently passed on and went to toad heaven after five happy years here on earth with us.)

Anyway, the cat jumped off my lap and went to investigate the cricket. That wasn’t so weird because I know cats get curious about little moving things. But after sniffing the cricket, our cat licked it up in a matter-of-fact way, swallowed, and came back to my lap for more petting. I couldn’t believe what I’d seen. I mean, I've never seen a cat do this before.

And I hoped that he wasn’t about to spit it up. (He didn’t.) Does your cat eat bugs? If so, what kind of bugs? Was he or she ever a stray? Is this normal cat behavior?

Copyright © Obsidian Bookshelf. I don't allow my content to be copied and reposted in full. You may use an excerpt (a few sentences) with a return link, but not the entire post.
Links:

Sunday, February 24, 2013

Pet weirdness - thinking of a name

We have a stray cat who adopted us about five years ago. I mean, what’s not to like about our back yard?

Plenty of water and moist dog-food chunks to eat. Of course, these things were intended for our turtles, but the cat had no problems with shouldering them aside and taking over their food.

Plenty of birds to hunt. We were also putting out birdseed for the hordes of pea-brained wild doves that seem to feel that it’s our duty to look after them along with the trees and other landscaping features in the back yard. No other cats or dogs.

So he settled in to stay in our back yard, and I didn’t catch on that he was ours until one rainy day (which almost never happens out here in the desert) in which he stayed on our back porch all day. Until then, I’d thought he was one of the neighborhood cats who frequently roamed across our property. But then I realized that he had no other place to go.

We bought him some dried cat-food and a heated doghouse, and the rest has been history. Except we couldn’t decide on a name for him. Which is funny because we’re usually good at names – at least for computers.

My husband has named computers on the network after ocean life (Mollusk, Oyster, Scallop) and cuts of meat (Sirloin, Ribeye, Porterhouse). I have named them after Confederate generals (Longstreet, Stuart, Beauregard) and Egyptian gods (Ptah, Isis, Horus).

But we couldn’t figure out a name for the cat until we went with the obvious, Little Gray. (He’s not so little now, being about 10 pounds.) How do you name your pets? After their appearance? Personality? After favorite characters in books or movies?

Copyright © Obsidian Bookshelf. I don't allow my content to be copied and reposted in full. You may use an excerpt (a few sentences) with a return link, but not the entire post.
Links:

Sunday, February 17, 2013

More Geeking Out


Okay, my latest aquisition is really cool. This is a 3.5-inch pewter miniature of General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson from the American Civil War, and it looks JUST LIKE HIM.

All the details are correct. Look at the brown sorrel pony he's riding, which was smaller than most of the officers' horses. And the shape of his beard. And the weird little squashed-up forage cap he always wore.

Stonewall Jackson was very unusual, even for a military genius. There is some modern-day speculation that he had Asperger's Syndrome, a form of high functioning autism.

From what I've read about his pre-Civil War career as an instructor at Virginia Military Institute, I could believe it. He taught physics with a military application and would memorize the textbook and lecture directly from it. If students disturbed his routine with questions, then obviously they weren't grasping the information. To help them, he would repeat the exact same lecture the following day, word for word. There are some cadets' letters that have survived to today in which they whine about him being their least favorite instructor, ha, ha!

He was also deeply devout (maybe even a religious fanatic) and yet he loved battle. He didn't like to fight on Sundays, but he would if he had to. And he was a devoted father and husband. Definitely a person of contradictions.

Some historians think that if he hadn't fallen at Chancellorsville, he would have turned the tide at Gettysburg and perhaps helped the South to win the Civil War. I believe the part about Gettysburg, but I don't think the South could have won the war overall. Not against generals like Grant and Sherman, who had far more men and materials. However, it's fun to speculate.

Even more than the attention to detail in this miniature, I like the energy that the figure holds. You can see this best in General Jackson's hands where he's pulling the reins and pointing. I do a little sculpture (whittling on a very basic level) and I'm fascinated by sculptures that capture energy and look alive.

Copyright © Obsidian Bookshelf. I don't allow my content to be copied and reposted in full. You may use an excerpt (a few sentences) with a return link, but not the entire post.
Links: